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Gateways of Qazvin

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Gateways of Qazvin

 

 

 

In the past the city of Qazvin had eight gateways. These were reputedly known as the Rast Gateway, Baq-e-Shah, Kooshk, Tabriz, Tehran, Sheikh Abad, Imamzadeh Hassan and Khandaqbar Gateways. Today, only two of these gateways have been remained, i.e., Kooshk and Tehran Gateways.

 

The first, the Darb-e Kushk or Darvazeh Kushk, in the north of town on Hafez Avenue, opens toward Alamout and the hunting grounds north of Qazvin and was built in 1917. It is a construction of the Qajar period which is richly decorated in blue, yellow, and white tilework. Above the central arch is the old emblem of Iran, the lion and the sun (the crowns of the lion have now been removed). The gate was constructed to resemble outward stretched arms. The side facing the city is made of plain brick and the side facing away from the city has elaborate tilework, which was added during the Qajar era (1785–1925). The gate has four minarets.

 

Darb Kooshk

 

The second gateway, known as the Gateway to Tehran or Darvazeh Tehran, is also a relic of the Qajar era. It can be seen at the eastern exit of town, on the road to Tehran. It was restored in the 1960s.

Tehran Gateway 4

 

Tehran Gate (Darvazeh-e-Qadim-e-Tehran) and Rah Kushk Gate are two dinky little Qajar decorative remnants of Qazvin’s once-vast city walls. The much more massive Ali Qapu was originally a 16th-century gateway to the royal precinct, a kind of forbidden inner city. Today it’s a police post so don’t take photographs.

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