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Hafezieh

 

 

Mohammad Shams-o-Din, known by his pen name Hafez. The celebrated Hafez was born in Shiraz in 1326 A.D. He is said to have known all the Qur'an by heart, Hafezhence earning the nick-name of Hafez. This respectful title means one who has memorized the Qur'an. He ranks as the most popular and best known poet in Iran. His collection (Divan) consists of 693 poems, of which 573 are odes that can be found in the homes of most people in Iran, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan, who learn his poems by heart and use them as proverbs and sayings to this day. His poems in one level celebrate the pleasures of drinking, hunting, and love at the court of Shiraz. On a deeper level, according to some scholars, they reflect his consuming devotion as a Sufi to union with the divine. There are many who consider this modest work as the great masterpiece of Persian Literature. Hafez is greatly admired both in Iran and in the west.

 

 

 

 

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His tomb in Shiraz is visited by so many admirers that it may be regarded as a shrine. Hafez spent most of his life in Shiraz and was buried in the Mosalla garden on the north bank of the Roknabad stream and house the marble tomb of Hafez. The present buildings built in 1935 and designed by the French architect. The tomb, its gardens and the surrounding memorials to other great figures are a focus of tourism in Shiraz. In his memory, a small dome-like structure was erected in Shiraz near his grave at Golgast-e Mosalla in 1452.

 

 

 

 

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Mosalla were gardens with the surface of over 19,000 square meters. The Hafezieh consisted of four central columns, with two room built at the east and west end and with the north and south sides remaining open. The buildings spilt the gardens in to two regions, with the orange grove in the front and the cemetery in the back. The actual tomb was outside of the structure, in the middle of the cemetery, with a marble slab placed over the grave. The marble was engraved by a calligrapher with excerpts from Hafez poetry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The original, four-columned memorial hall built in 1773 by Karimkhan Zand wasIMG_20150730_004532 expensively expanded, sixteen pillars were added to the four original, creating a long verandah, and on several facades are engraved Ghazals and other excerpts from Hafez's poetry. Several rectangular pools have been added amongst the garden, and well-maintained orange tree, paths, streams, and flower beds create a pleasant environment for the tourism hub of Hafez's tomb and memorial hall. A tea house on the grounds provides refreshments in a traditional setting. The dome over Hafez's grave is well lit at night, providing an attractive focal point.

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IMG_20150731_201435The street that Hafezieh is located on is paved with stones for the importance of the sight. On the weekends vehicles are not allowed to enter the street due to the rush-hours. Therefore, people can walk along the street and enjoy the beauty of the place. It is also good to know that the street is about 500 meters long.

 

 

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The gardens were also home to one of Shiraz's cemeteries, and Babur had a pool built IMG_20150731_201951here at the same time as the memorial. Believing they were ordered by omens in Hafez's poetry, Abbas 1 of Persian and Nader Shah both carried out separate restoration projects in the following 300 years. Alteration to Hafez's tomb involved elevating it one meter above ground level and encircling it with five steps. Eight columns each ten meters tall support a copper dome in the shape of a dervish's hat. The underside of the dome is an arabesque and colorful mosaic. The tomb was restored in 1857 by a governor of Fars, and a wooden enclosure was built around the tomb in 1878 by another governor of Fars. In 1899, Ardeshir, a Parsi from India began to build a shrine around Hafez's grave. This site remained in ruins for two years until 1901, when Prince Malek Mansour Mirza placed a decorative iron transenna around Hafez's tomb. It was inscribed with verses and the names of the patrons of the transenna.                

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